A New Century of War

On view October 18 through November 25, 2017

In August 1914, the world entered the 20th Century. It was the final summer of the “Belle Epoch,” and few could imagine the changes wrought by the assassination of a little-known Austro-Hungarian archduke and the four years of unfathomable slaughter that would follow. The United States entered the war in April 1917. At the time called “the war to end all wars,” in reality, World War I did nothing so much as provide a template for killing on an industrial scale, mindless nationalism, and suppression of dissent. With this, “the Great War” set a tone that outlasted the 20th Century and continues today.

The ramifications of the First World War are endless and varied, be they political or military, social or economic, entertainment, technology, population, environment, or family. This exhibition imparts new and surprising reflections on the world we have been given, the world we have seen flying by, and the world we are creating now—all of which are heavily influenced by the results of World War I.

Opening Reception:  Saturday, November 4th from 2:00-5:00pm

3:00-3:30pm ARTIST TALK

Join us for the opening reception to hear a brief talk on the Century that began in August 1914 with the outbreak of World War I and the exhibit that asks, "Will that Century ever end?" Artist, co-curator Walt Nygard, poet/journalist Jan Barry, writer Sarah Mess, and others confront the legacy of war--both past and present.

Malcolm Lubliner, "All Quiet on the Western Front," 2009

Drawings and photographs digitally reproduced on vinyl/canvas

Nathan Lewis, "Letter From a Soldier Under General Sykes Picot," 2017 Pulp print with pen on Combat Paper

Nathan Lewis, "Letter From a Soldier Under General Sykes Picot," 2017

Pulp print with pen on Combat Paper

Eric Avery, "New World Odor," 1991 Linoleum

Eric Avery, "New World Odor," 1991

Linoleum

View the full exhibition as a pdf here: 

A NEW CENTURY OF WAR (part one)

A NEW CENTURY OF WAR (part two)

High-resolution Powerpoint of the full exhibition available for viewing in our accessible main studio level.